Monday, July 26, 2010

Can You Top This??!!

Last December, we asked you how many times you got requests for donations in the last year. This was in response to one of our site users telling us about the outlandish number of requests he received from 15 charities, including a whopping 24 from the American Diabetes Association. Well, his experience has now been topped!

Last week, in a letter he enclosed with his generous donation, one of our users informed us that last year he received 1,170 requests and that, so far this year, he's already received 862! Mailing list sales are obviously very much alive and well.

So, tell us--can you top this? And, for those of you who are fed up with the practice of solicitation bombardment (and we know there are a lot of you), here's some some valuable information about how to reduce the number of mail solicitations you receive.

2 comments :

Robert said...

Two years ago I sent a polite letter to every charity to which I normally contributed stating that I was in support of their efforts to assist other citizens. However as a gay American being denied equal status at the hands of a majority of the very same people they were attempting to assist, when those people went to the polls, I'm more inclined to contribute only to those organizations that are working to secure my rights. I've been removed from nearly all those mailing lists. While I realize my response is selfish and shortsighted, with the political climate that currently permeates our society it's the only one with which I am emotionally comfortable.

Jodi said...

It's true that solicitations can be overwhelming. I have taken steps to reduce the mail I receive, myself.

However, there is one compelling reason why nonprofits mail them - they raise funds. Organizations are reaching out to new technologies, but the American donor still likes to donate by mail. Nonprofit organizations have a mission to fulfill and will do it in the most effective and efficient way possible. Today, that happens to be by mail.

So, I don't blame nonprofits for sending mail. In fact, I'd be concerned about an organization that didn't use the cheapest and easiest way to raise funds. Maybe I'd think that they don't need my money so much.