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Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Severe Flooding in South Asia



Heavy flooding throughout South Asia has displaced millions and resulted in over one thousand deaths. From food shortages to water-borne diseases to the destruction of schools and hospitals, it is estimated that over 41 million people have been impacted by the record breaking flooding. Below are 4 rated charities working to provide the services and support that those impacted by the flooding in South Asia need. Please consider supporting their work.

Islamic Relief USA: Islamic Relief USA strives to alleviate suffering, hunger, illiteracy, and diseases worldwide regardless of color, race, religion, or creed, and to provide aid in a compassionate and dignified manner. Incorporated in California in 1993, Islamic Relief operates a wide variety of projects, including education and training, water and sanitation, income generation, orphan support, health and nutrition, and emergency relief.


GlobalGiving: GlobalGiving works to build an efficient, open, thriving marketplace that connects people who have community and world-changing ideas with people who can support them. Our vision is to unleash the potential of people around the world to make positive change happen. GlobalGiving is an online marketplace that connects you to the causes and countries you care about.

MedShare: MedShare's mission is to improve the quality of life for people and the planet. MedShare is dedicated to improving healthcare and the environment through the efficient recovery and redistribution of the surplus of medical supplies and equipment to those most in need. We collect surplus medical supplies and equipment from hospitals, distributors and manufacturers, and then redistribute it to qualified healthcare facilities in the developing world.

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