Welcome to Charity Navigator's Blog!

The team from Charity Navigator, the nation's largest independent charity evaluator and leading donor advocate, shares their thoughts on emerging nonprofit-sector issues and offers tips to better inform your intelligent giving decisions.

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Charity Navigator: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 2018

Most of us are looking forward to the upcoming long weekend -- an extra day to sleep in, take care of errands and chores, and binge on our latest Netflix obsession. In the post-holiday winter slump it’s easy to forget why many of us are given this day off. Each January most of our schools and workplaces close to observe Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, a day set apart to remember the life and work of this important civil rights activist who diligently gave of himself to change the fabric of our culture and society. 

This year, instead of considering Monday to be a day off take it as a challenge to be a day on, and honor the work of Martin Luther King, Jr. by getting involved with a project in your community. This could be serving a meal at a local shelter, planting trees for future generations to enjoy, volunteering time at a local animal shelter, and the list goes on and on. 

You can use our Advanced Search Tool to find nonprofit organizations in your area. Reach out to them to see what needs they have and how you can pitch in. And, before you head out to volunteer, remember to check out our Guide to Volunteering to ensure you and the organization you’re working with get the most out of the experience.

Perhaps you’re not able to get out and volunteer on Monday -- that’s okay! Consider supporting a local organizations serving the neighbors in your community, or take a look at these great charities honoring the legacy of Dr. King.

Reimagining equal justice

The Southern Center for Human Rights (SCHR) is working for equality, justice, and dignity in our criminal justice system. Our mission is to end capital punishment, mass incarceration, and other criminal justice practices that are used to control the lives of poor people, people of color, and other marginalized groups in the Southern United States. We do this through death penalty representation, impact litigation, policy advocacy, and public education.

Protecting the future

The Alliance for Children's Rights is dedicated solely to protecting the rights of impoverished, abused and neglected children. By providing free legal services, the Alliance ensure that they have safe, stable homes, healthcare and the education they need to thrive. Since its founding in 1992, the Alliance has been a consistent safety net for more than 100,000 children and families.

Restoring hope and dignity one person at a time

SOME (So Others Might Eat) was founded by Father Horace McKenna, S.J. and an interfaith group of priests, ministers, and lay persons in 1970 to help feed the city's destitute citizens. Today, SOME is an interfaith, community-based organization that exists to help the poor and homeless of our nation's capital. We meet the immediate daily needs of the people we serve with food, clothing, and health care. We help break the cycle of homelessness by offering services, such as affordable housing, job training, addiction treatment, and counseling, to the poor, the elderly and individuals with mental illness. Each day, SOME is restoring hope and dignity one person at a time. We invite you to join us.

Improving working people’s standard of living, fighting for job security, and protecting workers’ right to organize

Jobs with Justice (JwJ) engages workers and allies in campaigns to win justice in workplaces and in communities where working families live. JwJ was founded in 1987 with the vision of lifting up workers' rights struggles as part of a larger campaign for economic and social justice. We believe in long-term multi-issue coalition building, grassroots base-building and organizing and strategic militant action as the foundation for building a grassroots movement, and we believe that by engaging a broad community of allies, we can win bigger victories. We reach working people through the organizations that represent them - unions, congregations, community organizations - and directly as JwJ activists. Nearly 100,000 people have signed the JwJ pledge to be there at least five times a year for someone else's struggle as well as their own.

No comments: